Mo Farah repeats as 5,000 champion, Canada’s Ahmed 4th

Britain’s Mo Farah won the men’s 5,000-metre final on Saturday, his second gold medal of the Rio Olympics.

Farah finished in 13 minutes 03.30 seconds to complete the double-double, having also won the 10,000 final last week.

Farah is the first man to defend the 10,000 and 5,000 Olympic titles since Finland’s Lasse Viren in 1976.

“It’s every athlete’s dream but I can’t believe it,” said Farah, who had to fight for his position early as the Ethiopians tried to set a strong pace. “I wasn’t going to let the inside lane go. I didn’t want to get boxed in”

Canada’s Mohammed Ahmed finished fourth in 13:05.94. He was originally disqualified for a lane infringement under Rule 163.3b, which would come from stepping on the line or off the inside of the track.

The 25-year-old was eventually reinstated.

“Just so disappointed. I put everything into this race,” said Ahmed, whose fourth-place finish was higher than Canada had ever placed in the event. “I went through so many emotions [in the past week].”

Ahmed appeared to be in contention for bronze in the final 400 metres, battling with American Paul Kipkemoi Chelimo for third place before running out of steam down the stretch. He crossed the line in fifth but moved up a spot when Muktar Edris of Ethiopia was disqualified.

Farah is the first man to defend the 10,000 and 5,000 Olympic titles since Finland’s Lasse Viren in 1976.

“It’s every athlete’s dream but I can’t believe it,” said Farah, who had to fight for his position early as the Ethiopians tried to set a strong pace. “I wasn’t going to let the inside lane go. I didn’t want to get boxed in”

Canada’s Mohammed Ahmed finished fourth in 13:05.94. He was originally disqualified for a lane infringement under Rule 163.3b, which would come from stepping on the line or off the inside of the track.

The 25-year-old was eventually reinstated.

“Just so disappointed. I put everything into this race,” said Ahmed, whose fourth-place finish was higher than Canada had ever placed in the event. “I went through so many emotions [in the past week].”

Ahmed appeared to be in contention for bronze in the final 400 metres, battling with American Paul Kipkemoi Chelimo for third place before running out of steam down the stretch. He crossed the line in fifth but moved up a spot when Muktar Edris of Ethiopia was disqualified.

Like Farah, Ahmed competed in the 10,000 last week, finishing in 32nd. He was hoping to redeem himself with a good showing in the 5,000.

“These last seven days or so, I’ve been agonizing over that 10K. I went through hell bringing myself to this race. And I felt like today I was finally back to myself,” said Ahmed. “I ran well and I saw that this was quick and I told myself, ‘You can kick with these guys.’ ”

“I just absolutely fell apart in the last 120 metres. The podium was right there. I could taste it.”

Chelimo, another runner who had his disqualification rescinded, finished second in 13:03.90.

Hagos Gebrhiwet of Ethiopia won bronze in 13:04.35.

Source:- CBCNEWS

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